home / category / ethnic diversities

Annotated Bibliography of Bully Books by Category

Ethnic Diversities

Level identifier in parentheses at end of descriptions
PB – picture book,
I – intermediate (most can be read to primary),
M – middle school,
H – high school.

book cover Never Fall Down by Patricia McCormick

HarperCollins, 2011. Set in Cambodia at the moment the Khmor Roughe starts herding the people out of the cities and into the fields, Arn, his aunt, sisters and brother try to survive though they are separated first by generation and then by gender. Before very long, Arn is on his own and realizes that if he wants to live he must become a Khomr soldier. M/H

My husband and I have visited one of the killing fields in Cambodia, walked across the ground where thousands died, their broken bones mixed into the soil, saw glass-cases filled with skulls, and in the trees, loudspeakers that blared music to cover the screams of people being bludgeoned to death. Children had stood by, waiting to push the bodies into the trenches before of them.

 

book cover

A Perfect Snow by Nora Martin. New York: Bloomsbury, 2002. Ben Campbell and his family live in a trailer in Logette, Montana, where his father has not been able to find a job, but he has found a church, the Guardians of the Identity, led by Lonn, who believes our problems are almost always someone else's fault. Ben drops out when he realizes the Guardians are a hate group, but his brother doesn't.

book cover

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie, illus. by Ellen Forney. New York: Little, Brown, 2007. Based on his own experiences, Alexie describes a year in the challenging life of Arnold (aka Junior), who loves to draw cartoons, as he deals with tragedies in his family and life in a high school where he is the only Indian.

book cover Bitter End by Jennifer Brown

Little, Brown , 2011. With her senior year nearing its end, Alex and her two best friends have been planning a trip to Colorado. Instead she falls for the new guy, Cole, who is handsome, romantic, and very attentive, however, she soon discovers he is also controlling, manipulative and physically abusive-can she love him out of that? (H)

 

book cover

Bone by Bone by Bone by Tony Johnston. New York: Roaring Brook, 2007. In 1950s Tennessee, pre-teenager David's racist father forbids him to play with Malcolm, a black friend, but the boys continue to carry on their special relationship amid racial attacks. (I)

book cover

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyle. New York: David Flickling Books, 2006. In 1942, nine-year-old Bruno moves with his family to "OutWith" where his father is the new commandant, but no one explains to Bruno about the wire fence outside his bedroom window or the hundreds of people on the other side all shrinking away and wearing striped pajamas. (H)

book cover

The Brothers Torres by Coert Voorhees. New York: Hyperion, 2008. Frankie has always looked up to his older brother Steve, but now Steve seems on a path contrary to all their family's values in joining the Cholos. As Frankie finds his path, he runs straight into his brother.

book cover Busing Brewster by Richard Michelson, illustrator R.G. Roth.

Set in Boston during 1974 when court ordered-busing started, the main character, Brewster and his brother are taken to their first day in a white school. Though there are words thrown by children and adults, Brewster finds the right adult to help him, Miss O'Grady, the librarian, who encourages Brewster in his hopes to one day become president.

I like that history is woven with the realities of today, Brewster might just get to be president, and there were white people who believed in the busing. Alfred A. Knopf/Random House, 2010. "Random House Children's Books supports the First Amendment and celebrates the right to read." (Printed on the copy write page) P/B

 

book cover

Code Talker: A Novel about the Navajo Marines of World War Two by Joseph Bruchac. New York: Dial, 2005. An old Navajo describes his experiences as a young boy in a boarding school that repressed his native language, and then what happened when he joined the U.S. military at the age of sixteen and was recruited to become one of the select code talkers to fight in the bloody battles of Bougainville, Guam, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. (M)

book cover

The Confessional by J. L. Powers. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2007. After the murder of a student, the all boy Jesuit High School in El Paso has to face the escalating prejudices between the Mexicans, the Mexican-American, and the Texas-Americans

book cover

Day of Tears: A Novel in Dialogue by Julius Lester. New York: Jump at the Sun, 2005. Through a variety of first-person points of view, Lester recreates a horrendous event in history: the largest slave auction (over 400 individuals) in America, held in Savannah, Georgia, in 1859. (H)

book cover

Do Unto Otters--A Book About Manners by Laurie Keller. New York: Henry Holt, 2007.   Mr. Rabbit gets worried when the new neighbors are Otters. He doesn't know any otters, he has never met an otter-they are different! Then Owl tells him to "treat otters the same way you'd like otters to treat you."

book cover

Face Relations: 11 Stories About Seeing Beyond Color edited by Marilyn Singer. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2004. Stories by Rita Williams-Garcia, Ron Koertge, Joseph Bruchac, Ellen Wittlinger, Kyoko Mori, and others illustrate various racial perspectives.

book cover

The Family Book by Todd Parr. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2003.   Using human and animal families displayed through colorful graphics, Parr writes about ways families are different and alike.

book cover

A Friendship for Today by Patricia C. McKissack. Scholastic Press, 2007. Set in Missouri in 1954, twelve-year-old Rosemary will start sixth grade at an all white school. At her new school, Rosemary experiences prejudice, she realizes Grace Hamilton suffers it also as the other white kids call her "white trash."

book cover

Feathers by Jacqueline Woodson. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 2007. Set it 1971, Frannie and her family live on one side of the highway and the white people live on the other side, but she and her friends have a new experience when a new student shows up and he looks white.

book cover

Generation Dead by Daniel Waters. New York: Hyperion, 2008. Adam Layman, the biggest guy on the football team, and Phoebe Kindall, his best friend and goth-girl neighbor, approach their senior year with trepidation as the number of dead kids attending keeps growing. Now, Tommy Williams, a dead kid, has even tried out for football, but the head coach has put out a hit on him! The prejudice in the school and community parallels all the real life prejudices that exist against minorities.

book cover

The Gold-Threaded Dress by Carolyn Marsden. Cambridge: Candlewick Press, 2002. Although Oy is from Thailand, the students in her fourth-grade class call her Chinita, Spanish for little Chinese. What she wants most is to be accepted by Lilianda and invited to her club house, and if Oy brings her traditional Thai dress to school that might happen.

book cover

The Hoopster by Alan Lawrence Sitomer. New York: Jump at the Sun, 2005. Although he's a hotshot at basketball, Andre wants to be a writer, but his piece about racism in the local newspaper gets him brutally attacked by racists.

book cover

House of the Red Fish by Graham Salisbury. New York: Wendy Lamb Books, 2006. In this companion piece to Under the Blood-Red Sun, Tomi Nakaji and his friends are determined to raise Tomi's father's sunken fishing sampan from where it was scuttled by the military a year earlier, while trying to deal with a haole bully whose racist father controls the lives of Tomi's family. (H)

book cover

Koyal Dark, Mango Sweet by Kashmira Sheth. New York: Hyperion, 2006. Set in Mumbai, India, Jeeta is the youngest, least traditional of three sisters, and may be too dark to marry well. While her mother worries about her marriage prospects, Jeeta looks towards college. (H)

book cover

Jungle Drums by Graeme Base. Harry N. Abrams, 2004. Ngiri, the smallest of the warthogs, knows no one respects the warthogs, that is not until he plays the magic drum and changes everything. (PB)

book cover

Let's Talk About Race by Julius Lester, illustrated by Karen Barbour. New York: Amistad, 2005. Told in first person, Julius Lester talks about race and asks simple questions that lead readers to the understanding that we are all much more than our skin.

book cover

Mexican White Boy by Matt de la Peña. New York: Delacorte Press, 2008. Sixteen-year-old Danny does not feel at home in his father's Mexican world or his mother's white world. Before he can live in either, he has to find out who he is.

book cover

My Name Is Bilal by Asma Mobin-Uddin, illustrated by Barbara Kiwak. Boyds Mills Press, 2005.  Bilal and his sister Ayesha move to a new school where they are harassed because they are Muslim.

book cover

No Castles Here by A.C.E. Bauer. New York: Random House, 2007. Auggie spends most of his time inside waiting for his mom to come home from her waitress job. As one of two white kids in the neighborhood, he tries to be invisible and avoid the class bully, Dwaine, the other white kid. One day he catches a train to Philadelphia, goes into a bookstore and finds a fantasy book that becomes part of the story. (M)

book cover

Nothing Wrong with a Three-Legged Dog by Graham McNamee. New York: Random House, 2000. As the only white kid in his fourth grade class, Keath gets called Whitey, Va-nilla, and Mayonnaise, and his best friend Lynda gets called Zebra because her mom is black and her dad is white.

book cover

The Playground Problem by Margaret McNamara, illustrated by Mike Gordon. New York: Aladdin Paperbacks, 2004.  During first grade recess, the boys play soccer, but when Emma asks if she can play, the boys all agree that girls cannot play soccer. Emma is furious, but that night her dad helps her come up with a plan. The next day, Emma and the girls play soccer on their own, and soon the boys realize girls and boys can play on the same team.

book cover

Played by Dana Davidson. New York: Hyperion, 2005. Ian Striver, a handsome junior in a large Detroit high school, pledges an underground fraternal group, Freaky Boys Incorporated (FBI). His initiation dictates he must date, seduce, and prove it to the other FBIs-in three weeks. Kylie, the plain girl selected at random, has much to learn-and much to teach as the story unravels.

book cover

Rebound by Bob Krech. Tarrytown, NY: Marshal Cavendish Corp, 2006. All the other Polish guys wrestle but seventeen-year-old Ray Wisniewski just wants to play basketball. In hopes of developing his skills, he joins ROCK, a summer league, where he is one of a few white guys, but discovers that basketball brings him many new friends. Great book for discussion of racism on both the black and white sides but also blacks who stand up for whites and whites who stand up for blacks-standing up for what is just. (H)

book cover

The Skin I'm In by Sharon G. Flake. New York: Jump at the Sun, 2000. Because Maleeka has dark-black skin and Miss Saunders, the new English teacher, has a white mark over half her face, mean-spirited Charlese doesn't let up on either of them. (M)

book cover

Sticks and Stones by Beth Goobie. Victoria, B.C.: Orca Soundings, 2002. Falsely labeled as a "slut," Jujube fights back against the slurs whispered in the hallways and written on the bathroom walls of her school. (M)

book cover

Th1rteen R3asons Why by Jay Asher. New York: Razor Bill, 2007. Two weeks ago Hannah Baker committed suicide, but before she did, she made audiotapes explaining her reasons. When the book opens, Clay Jensen is listening to the tapes. These two voices narrate the story giving the reader a full picture of all that happened to Hannah since ninth grade. One of the first authors to deal with bullycide, Asher gives the reader a thorough analysis of sexual harassment, from a few hurtful words to destructive actions Hannah cannot escape.

book cover

Under the Same Sky by Cynthia DeFelice. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2003. When his dad offers him a job on the family farm, fourteen-year-old Joe Pederson thinks it will be an easy way to earn money for a motorbike. In this coming of age story, Joe gains compassion and respect for the Mexican crew he works with, as well as some clarity about his spoiled white friends.

book cover

Vive La Paris by Esme Raji Codell. New York: Hyperion Book, 2006. Fifth grader Paris starts an Extreme Readers Club at school, takes piano lessons from Mrs. Rosen, a Jewish Neighbor who survived the concentration camps of World War II, and has four older brothers, one of which gets bullied by a girl in Paris' class. This is a wonderful book with very rich characters and content.

book cover

Who Will Tell My Brother by Marlene Carvell. New York: Hyperion, 2002. Though Evan has always been conscious of his Mohawk heritage, it is not until his senior year in high school that he feels the need to take a stand by asking the school board to change the offensive school Indian mascot. Though his attempts are quiet and follow the established recourse, the harassment he suffers ranges from personal verbal attacks to violence against his whole family. (M)

book cover

Yankee Girl by Mary Ann Rodman. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004. It is 1964, and Alice Moxley's dad, an FBI agent, has just been reassigned to Jackson, Mississippi, to cover the integration of public schools. No one in Alice's sixth grade class will talk to her because she is a Yankee, but that is nothing compared to how all the students and teachers treat Valerie Taylor, who integrates Alice's class. The KKK adds another level of harassment by burning its initials in Alice's front lawn and planting a car bomb that kills Valerie's father. (M)

book cover

Yellow Line by Sylvia Olsen. Victioria: Orca Book Publishing, 2005. Vince and Sherry have been best friends since they were babies, but now she is dating Steve, an Indian, in a town where whites live on one side of the yellow line in the road and the First Nation lives on the other. And they never mix. (H)

Back to Books by Behavior list

home / behaviors / The "Isms"